By Harvey Byrne

European giants Borussia Dortmund are monitoring Tottenham defender Kevin Wimmer, according to a report.

The Evening Standard has named the Bundesliga side alongside Wolfsburg and Southampton as three clubs interested in the Spurs 24-year-old.

The Austria international is currently the backup centre-back to Jan Vertonghen with Mauricio Pochettino liking to play left footed players on the left and vice versa for the right.

However, this has seen Wimmer play just five times this campaign and it is stated that it is “highly likely” that the German sides will make a move in the summer.

The centre-back initially made the move to White Hart Lane from Bundesliga outfit FC Koln in a £4.3million deal in the summer of 2015.

Wimmer built up a strong reputation in Germany, playing 73 times for the Colonge-based side, but he has struggled to see regular game time in England.

The Austrian enjoyed his best run of matches in the side near the end of last season after Vertognhen suffered a spell on the sidelines with an injury.

However, with just 26 appearances to his name in over a year he may now be keen to move away from north London.

Football Insider verdict:

Wimmer’s lack of game time this season has surprised many. However, given that Tottenham boast stars Toby Alderweireld and Vertonghen in their back four no one is going to question it. It has become clear that the Austria international needs to leave north London if he has aspirations of becoming a regular defender at club level. Dortmund would be the next best club to go to after Spurs, but Southampton have a good recent record of helping to coach centre-backs into Premier League stars. The Saints have helped Dejan Lovren and Alderweireld progress in the past, while Virgil van Dijk is now looking similar. The Holland international is the south coast side’s left sided centre-back, meaning that a move to Southampton could be best for Wimmer.

In other Tottenham transfer news, Pochettino has given the green light for these three players to quit in January.